Cathedral Church of the Redemption

Surely the Lord is in this place..this is none other then the house of God.
The story of the Cathedral Church of the Redemption India revolves around its journey from an Englishman’s congregation to a multicultural one. In its diversity and its community work, the present Church has come to fulfil the founders’ vision of a common home, a meeting place for all sects and creeds. 
Tucked away from the bustle of New Delhi, in the quiet Church lane north of Jaipur Column and to the west of Parliament House at North Avenue, stands the Cathedral Church of the Redemption India. The Church’s centralized plan blends neatly with Sir Edwin Lutyens city plan. With Viceroy Lord Irwin’s keen support, the Church, built on Henry Alexander Medd?s (1892-1977) design, was opened for public worship on Sunday, 18 January 1931. H.A.N. Medd’s design was inspired by the Palladio Church of Il Redentore in Venice as well as Lutyens, Hampstead church. 
The Church, a witness to nearly eight decades of history, is a sanctuary of quiet meditation, prayer and generous giving. It is home to a vibrant parish and a wonderful tribute to Indian Christian life.
The linear plain exteriors of the church are in contrast with the high rounded arches inside. The spiritual aura of the church is enhanced by the light streaming through its crescent windows and a group of angels that look down from the curved roof above the altar. Regular mass takes place at the Cathedral Church of the Redemption on Sunday mornings. Apart from this, the cathedral also hosts religious concerts on festivals such as Christmas and Easter. It also maintains a personal choir, called the Capital City Minstrels. You can catch these concerts of choral music and carol singing on religious occasions and festivals

Sultan Garhi – Country’s first tomb

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Country’s first tomb, Sultan Garhi built by Sultan Iltutmish in 1231 for his eldest son and Razia Sultana’s brother, Nasiruddin Mahmood, situated in the woodlands of Vasant Kunj [opposite Sector C, Pocket 9, Vasant Kunj in Delhi. At that time this place was known as Malkapur.

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Iltumish was the first Sultan of the Slave Dynasty who ruled in Delhi from 1210 to 1236 A.D. The area where the Ghari (meaning: cave) tomb is situated, was part of the first city of medieval Delhi known as the  Slave Dynasty that ruled during the period 1206 to 1290

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It is noteworthy that people of neighbouring areas of Mahipalpur and Rangpur consider it as the tomb of saintly ‘peer’ and come here for worship. It is a venerable place of worship and prayers for both Hindus and Muslims. For new brides of these villages it is almost a must to visit this place for worship.

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Satpula :The Bridge of Seven Openings

On the main Press Enclave Road near Khirki Village, their is a interesting 14th century waterworks known as Satpula (`Seven Bridges’).

Satpula, a weir about 65m high, was built by Mohammad bin Tughlaq in 1323. When Mohammad bin Tughlaq ascended the throne of Delhi, he built a new city for himself called Jahanpanah.

Satpula or the weir is an impressive example of the waterworks projects carried out under the Tughlaq dynasty.

Satpula consisted of a solidly built stone dam with seven wooden sluices  to regulate the flow of water from an artificial lake (filled with rainwater) to the fields outside the city.

Satpula itself, with its solid walls and seven arched openings, has recently been restored by the Archaeological Survey of India. You can climb up onto the wide parapet and see the structure for yourself, but don’t expect anyone to guide you around—there isn’t likely to be anyone there. Satpula can be visited any time, and there isn’t any entry fee.

Delhi War Cemetery

 3rd in the series of ‘Things to do & see in Delhi before you die.
Deserted and lonely un-guarded entrance

How to reach there :
Proceed to Delhi Cantonment by taking the Ring Road in the direction of Naraina from Dhaula Kuan multi-level crossing and continue for 3 km to reach Brar Square traffic junction. There are roadside boards on both sides of this junction. Take a right turn over the railway crossing and after approximately 1km, you will find the cemetery on the right hand side of the road. Do not expect any one , not even a guard at this cemetery. Its totally deserted and a lonely place. Only crisp sound of birds will welcome you. And don’t surprised in case you find Love Birds too in the cemetery. The gates are permanently locked. So you have to jump over to get inside. Don’t’ forget to remove your shoes before you step in on well maintained grassy lawn as a respect to brave soldiers. And remember, this place is not a picnic spot.

Historical Information:
 
Delhi War Cemetery was created in 1951 when graves from many cemeteries in northern India were moved into the site to ensure their permanent maintenance. Among them are graves from cantonment cemeteries in Allahabad, Kanpur, Dehra Dun and Lucknow. There are now 1,022 Commonwealth casualties of the Second World War buried, or commemorated by special memorial, in this cemetery together with a number of war graves of other nationalities, mostly Dutch.
In 1966, 99 First World War burials were also moved into the cemetery from Nicholson Cemetery, Kashmir Gate, Delhi. This War Cemetery also contains the DELHI 1914-18 MEMORIAL, commemorating 153 casualties buried in Meerut Cantonment Cemetery where their graves could no longer be maintained.
More than 25,000 servicemen of the forces of undivided India died during the Second World War in non-operational zones.

 

Jashn-e-Khusrau (4th to 14th March 2010 )

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Jashn-e-Khusrao celebrates the sufiana kalaam ( mystical poetry of Islam ) of Amir Khusrau(1253 -1325) rendered in the shrine of his beloved pir, Hazarat Nizamuddin Auliya , the Kalaam has been kept alive for over 700 years by the Shrine qawawals. The tradition of qawwali as told by the qawwals, begin with Amir Khusrau who trained some chosen talented boys in the art.
The festival begins at the Basti’s Mughal-era Chaunsath Khambha. Lying next to Mirza Ghalib’s tomb, the white-marble monument will host qawwali concerts by artists from India and Pakistan.
Dates and time: 5th, 6th, 7th; all at 6.30 pm.
On 10th, 6.30 pm, the action moves to India International Center (IIC), with a poetry recital and a photo exhibition. From 12th to 14th, Qawwali sessions will be hosted in the IIC lawns
By Vivek Sharma Posted in Delhi