Najaf Khan’s Tomb

nzWhile coming back from work I usually take back lanes of South Delhi to avoid the heavy traffics of Ring road etc.  On one such detour I suddenly spotted this tomb, stopped my car to find out more. And to my utter surprise, in the middle of busy Lodhi Colony and Aurbindo Marg, this lush green and well maintained tomb is a shock to me as I proudly call my self a pure Delhi wala Sad smile 

The tomb is built in the centre of the Mughal Charbagh styled garden However, what makes the tomb a strange piece of architecture is the fact that it has been constructed as a structure without a dome, from a distance it looks no more than a plinth with 2 cenotaphs on top of it. That is actually how it is also. But the plinth or the base is arched and has chambers on it. The cenotaphs can be reached from a double sided staircase on the eastern side.

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As its famous दिल्ली शहरों का शहर है, ( Delhi is city of many cities ), this tomb unveiled a new story to me. Came back home and searched more info about it and found out this :

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Mirza Najaf Khan (1723– April 26, 1782) was a Persian adventurer in the court of Mughal emperor Shah Alam II. He had royal lineage, having been a Safavi prince, when that dynasty was deposed by Nader Shah in 1736. He came to India around 1740 and may even have come a year earlier with the Afsharids. His sister married into the family of the Nawab of Awadh. He also held the title of Deputy Wazir of Awadh. He served during the Battle of Buxar and his main contribution in history was as the highest commander of the Mughal army from 1772 till his death in April 1782.

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Najafgarh which is located at the outskirts of the south western part of Delhi, was named after the same Kiledar (Fort Administrator) Nazaf Khan of the Mughal Dynasty during the 16th century

How to get there :

To get to the tomb, the closest metro station is “Jor Bagh”, from where the tomb is a 10-minutes walk toward BK Dutt Colony.

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Humayun’s Tomb : Photo Essay

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Located near the crossing of Mathura road and Lodhi road, this magnificent garden tomb is the first substantial example of Mughal architecture in India.

Humayun died in 1556, and his widow Hamida Banu Begam, also known as Haji Begam, commenced the construction of his tomb.

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Mirak Mirza Ghiyath, a Persian, was the architect employed by Haji Begam for this tomb.

Several rulers of the Mughal dynasty lie buried here. Bahadur Shah Zafar had taken refuge in this tomb with three princes during the first war of Independence (AD 1857).

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On the southwestern side of the tomb is located barber’s tomb (Nai-ka-Gumbad) which stands on a raised platform, reached by seven steps from the south.

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India Gate

ig India Gate by bArfaNibAbA
                                                                   India Gate, a photo by bArfaNibAbA on Flickr.

The India Gate is the national monument of India. Situated in the heart of New Delhi, it was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

The monument is inspired by the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, which in turn is inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus. It was built in 1931. Originally known as the All India War Memorial, it is a prominent landmark in Delhi and commemorates the 90,000 soldiers of the British Indian Army who lost their lives in World War I and the Third Anglo-Afghan War. It is composed of red and pale sandstone and granite.

Originally, a statue of George V, Emperor of India stood under the now vacant canopy in front of the India Gate, but it was removed to Coronation Park together with a number of other British Raj-era statues. Following India’s independence, the India Gate became the site of the Indian Army’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, known as Amar Jawan Jyoti (“the flame of the immortal soldier”).

During night, India Gate is dramatically floodlit while the fountains nearby make a lovely display with coloured lights. India Gate stands at one end of Rajpath, and the area surrounding it is generally referred to as ‘India Gate

Another amazing fact about Delhi’s India Gate is that it is the country’s single largest point for selling ice-cream, closely followed by Chennai’s Marina Beach. India Gate is the place where ice cream companies create brand awareness. The biggest battle for market share in the country’s multi crores ice-cream business takes place at India Gate.

Cathedral Church of the Redemption

Surely the Lord is in this place..this is none other then the house of God.
The story of the Cathedral Church of the Redemption India revolves around its journey from an Englishman’s congregation to a multicultural one. In its diversity and its community work, the present Church has come to fulfil the founders’ vision of a common home, a meeting place for all sects and creeds. 
Tucked away from the bustle of New Delhi, in the quiet Church lane north of Jaipur Column and to the west of Parliament House at North Avenue, stands the Cathedral Church of the Redemption India. The Church’s centralized plan blends neatly with Sir Edwin Lutyens city plan. With Viceroy Lord Irwin’s keen support, the Church, built on Henry Alexander Medd?s (1892-1977) design, was opened for public worship on Sunday, 18 January 1931. H.A.N. Medd’s design was inspired by the Palladio Church of Il Redentore in Venice as well as Lutyens, Hampstead church. 
The Church, a witness to nearly eight decades of history, is a sanctuary of quiet meditation, prayer and generous giving. It is home to a vibrant parish and a wonderful tribute to Indian Christian life.
The linear plain exteriors of the church are in contrast with the high rounded arches inside. The spiritual aura of the church is enhanced by the light streaming through its crescent windows and a group of angels that look down from the curved roof above the altar. Regular mass takes place at the Cathedral Church of the Redemption on Sunday mornings. Apart from this, the cathedral also hosts religious concerts on festivals such as Christmas and Easter. It also maintains a personal choir, called the Capital City Minstrels. You can catch these concerts of choral music and carol singing on religious occasions and festivals

Sultan Garhi – Country’s first tomb

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Country’s first tomb, Sultan Garhi built by Sultan Iltutmish in 1231 for his eldest son and Razia Sultana’s brother, Nasiruddin Mahmood, situated in the woodlands of Vasant Kunj [opposite Sector C, Pocket 9, Vasant Kunj in Delhi. At that time this place was known as Malkapur.

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Iltumish was the first Sultan of the Slave Dynasty who ruled in Delhi from 1210 to 1236 A.D. The area where the Ghari (meaning: cave) tomb is situated, was part of the first city of medieval Delhi known as the  Slave Dynasty that ruled during the period 1206 to 1290

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It is noteworthy that people of neighbouring areas of Mahipalpur and Rangpur consider it as the tomb of saintly ‘peer’ and come here for worship. It is a venerable place of worship and prayers for both Hindus and Muslims. For new brides of these villages it is almost a must to visit this place for worship.

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